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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
spending, we've got that fiscal cliff coming up january 1. might this conversation somehow be used to make some progress on that? >> reporter: it could because of the fact the other person on mitt romney's schedule today is congressman paul ryan, the house budget chairman. of course was his running mate back during the campaign. paul ryan has a key role in these budget talks of course as well. where they stand, a short time ago vice president biden went to a local costco here in washington, d.c., proclaimed himself optimistic they would get a deal. the fact of the matter yesterday, erskine bowles, a key player as well, saying he is slightly pessimistic. he says there is 2/3 chance they will go off the fiscal cliff. that is not what the markets want to hear, jon. jon: not at all. ed henry at the white house. if jay carney relents and let you into the meeting give us a shot. we'll be on air. >> reporter: i will give you a copy of the menu. jon: please do, thanks. jenna: we'll forget about politicians just for a moment. i promise we'll return there surely over the next couple hours. let's tal
discussion on spending cuts so far. and unless there is, there is a real danger of going off the fiscal cliff. going off the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy, it will cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to avert the fiscal cliff by passing legislation to stop all the tax hikes, to replace the sequester, and pave the way for tax reform and entitlement reform. we are the only one was a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect the american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. but without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it's going to be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap, it needs leadership. it's time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they are really willing to make. i'll take a few questions. it's been very clear over the last year and a half, i talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budget. where we outline very specific p
over that so-called fiscal cliff. tax hikes and spending cuts kick in if no agreement is reached between the house and republicans on how to close the budget gap. it has been more than two weeks since president obama invited the major players to the white house to discuss the situation. as of this morning, no new talks are scheduled. brianna keilar joins us. so many republicans say they are pessimistic about a deal happening in time to avert this fiscal cliff. some say it's for political reasons. what can you tell us? >> it may all be for political reasons. that's no surprise in washington. as you can seen through dealmaking not just on this but things in the past couple of years between the white house and congress, there is almost this rhythm that has evolved. both sides are pointing to the other for an impasse. republicans like senator lindeyy graham just slamming the white house and tim geithner for a plan he laid out on behalf of the administration, laying out about $1.6 trillion in new revenues coupled with only about $400 billion in medicare cuts. listen to what graham sai
isn't even a start. six governors, democrats, and republicans weigh in on the fiscal cliff today. what will they tell president obama about the spending cuts and tax increases now just 28 days away? >> we must reign in our out of control spending. >> reporter: republicans have an offer, $800 billion in new taxes, half what the president wanted. $600 billion saved in part by making americans wait until they're 67 to get medicare. plus more cuts totalling $2.2 trillion. but no tax hikes for the wealthy. >> that's just not going to happen. >> reporter: the pentagon could take the biggest hit from president obama told defense experts monday, don't worry. >> even as we make very tough fiscal choices, we're going to keep investing in these programs. >> reporter: he went online on youtube and twitter explaining why he thinks the rich should pay more. going over the fiscal cliff could cost america jobs. >> we're only expanding 2% right now. it needs to be considerably higher to bring more people off unemployment. >> reporter: for the jobless, president obama is asking congress for millions mor
. this is not the whole fiscal cliff but just the sequester. $1.2 trillion of mandatory spending cuts over ten years and scheduled for january 2nd. half of that money cut in defense. half in everything else. next year alone could take $65 billion out of spending and a million jobs versus growing 2 million which is what the u.s. is on track to do now. i fully understand the government needs to spend less and spend more efficiently but how you achieve it is as important as how much you cut and the sledge hammer approach is not economically sound. now, there are targeted and measured ways to do it without driving the country in to another recession. some debate today as to whether we're in one or not but the sequester will only make things worse. congress, solve it. solve it nowme. we're all watching. housing is hot. if you have credit and money for a down payment, the perfect time to buy. nationally, affordability is the best it's been in a long time. new york city is the least affordable place in america to purchase a home. no big surprise here. home prices in new york are nearly two and a half times
federal spending cuts unless congress and the president act so-called fiscal cliff. on the senate floor today, top senate democrat, here he was, harry reid, said the republican counteroffer unveiled yesterday is a serious proposal. reid called the offer a nonstarter. his word. but a serious proposal nonetheless. in an interview just today with bloomberg tv, president obama did not reject the gop offer outright. officials have called it a step backward, not worthy of a counteroffer. but, you know, bottom line here, you have two sides they appear to be pretty far apart with no new negotiations happening at least not to our knowledge. so, with me now from capitol hill is representative peter wel welch. democrat from vermont. good to see you. thanks for coming on. >> thank you. >> so let me just pose this one to you. you just heard harry reid, would you agree with harry reid the plan offered yesterday by that house speaker is, quote unquote, a serious plan? >> well, you know, i don't know the details of it. it is $800 billion supposedly in revenues and it is a lot of medicare cuts but not s
some washington over the fiscal cliff. everyone's taxes go up. massive spending cuts take hold in just 29 days if the white house and congress can't reach a deal. and they are barely talking right now. abc's jon karl has the latest. good morning, jon. >> reporter: good morning, george. with less than a month to go, the two sides are as far apart as they have ever been. overnight, the president released a new campaign-style video aimed squarely at republicans. >> we need to get tax relief to working families. >> reporter: this morning, about the only thing that the two sides agree on is that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would be a big blow to the economy. >> it would be very damaging to average americans. there's no doubt about it. >> going over the cliff will hurt our economy, will hurt our job creation in our country. it's not fair to the american people. >> reporter: without a deal to cut the deficit, almost everybody's income taxes will go up january 1st. it's more than that. there will be automatic cuts to defense, to medicare doctors, to unemployment benefits. and that co
, spending cuts. that's what the fiscal cliff is all about. it would all start with the start of the new year. i want to get to senator jeff merkley. he's a democrat from the state of oregon. he's on both the budget committee and the banking, housing, and urban affairs committee. nice to have you with us, sir. thanks for joining us. >> you're welcome. >> thank you. before we get to fiscal cliff, let's talk a little bit about syria. there are now reports that they may be loading the components that would make up sarin gas. and i'm curious to know and i think a lot of people are watching this, does this mean that we are headed, the united states is headed into military action considering what we know about the red line, if you will, that hillary clinton laid out pretty clearly? >> it was very important for her to draw a very clear line. because any use of chemical weapons has to be responded to internationally. i'm sure the secretary of state is immersed with russia right now, is in negotiations with russia for a united front against this absolutely unacceptable possibility. >> okay. so she's l
the fiscal cliff. that's called into question the anti-tax pledge republicans have signed. iffer some lawmaker that is means no agreement. >> it is not the norquist pledge but the americans no tax reform pledge and the one thing really keeping republicans -- i don't know what republicans stand for. it looks like for this in washington, it's a host of things. at least the democrats are responsible enough to get loans from china. the republicans want to do it without paying for it without any fiscal discipline. at one point the republicans have to do it -- the pledge was the last they based it on. >> nothing was done, though. that's a bad thing, aaron. >> why? i'm not sure that it is. i'm not sure that this fiscal cliff really is a fiscal cliff. i think that it changes the baseline. republicans get better negotiating position on the other side when they are not scared to death of their own shadow and fearful of not looking reasonable. to think that the same joker who is got us this compromise will somehow get us a better compromise is absolutely silly. some of these guys have been voted
parties taking to the airwaves this weekend, trying to blame each other over the fiscal cliff talk. this is all happening less than a month until accommodation of spending cuts and tax hikes kicks in. right now, it seems like both sides are moving further apart from the deal. here is house speaker john boehner and treasury secretary timothy geithner. >> we are flabbergasted. we have seven weeks between election day in the end of the year. three of those weeks have been wasted. >> we are not going to extend an extension of the tax rates. we think they need to go back to those levels. if you don't do that, you have to ask yourself, whose taxes are we going to raise? were we going to find the money bring a balanced plan in place? jenna: senator lindsey graham, a republican known for reaching across the aisle, not looking at this with a great deal of optimism. >> i think we're going over the fiscal cliff. it's pretty clear that they have made this happen. they are not saving social security and medicare and medicaid from imminent bankruptcy. jenna: james is live in washington with more
's economy goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. the white house and congressional republicans said to be deadlocked. president obama released his plan. it includes 1.6 trillion dollars in new tax increases. 50 billion in new stimulus spending. and stimulus, and new power to raise the debt ceiling without congressional approval. tim geithner, john boehner appearing with chris wallace on fox news sunday. >> we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to get this question resolved but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. they have actually asked for more revenue than they have been asking the whole entire time. >> in kind of a tough position now. it is going to be, obviously a little hard for them now. they're trying to figure out where they go next. we might need to give them a little more time to let them go next. we did what you expect from us. we laid out a very detailed, carefully designed set of spending savings and tax changes that help put us back on a path to fiscal responsibility. bill: where are we
, starting january 1st we go over that so-called fiscal cliff, tax rates go up not just for the rich but for the middle class, for everyone, all those cuts in domestic spending and naths security spending, they go into effect. people aren't going to be happy about that, and the president will be able to say, look, i begged them, i repeatedly said 98% of the american public, they wouldn't get a tax increase if we just took them out of the equation, let's pass legislation extending the bush tax cuts for everyone earning under $250,000 a year. they didn't do it. so, you know, he'll have some leverage on that in terms of the politics because politically, you know, the polls all are very consistent. the election results are pretty consistent. the american public is ready for a modest increase in taxes for the upper 2% of taxpayers. having said that, there's another issue that's coming up in february or march and that's raising the debt ceiling once again. the republicans have a lot of leverage on that right now because the white house, the administration will desperately want to raise tha
a fallback plan for the so called "fiscal cliff", which includes extending tax cuts for the middle class and resuming a fight over spending and taxes for the wealthy later. meanwhile, going overseas, nato makes a move on the turkish border with syria. military officials deny preparations for military intervention. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to so
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)